Hare krishna, hare, hare, rama, krishna, krishna

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For curiosity’s sake, Mom and I decided to visit the massive ISKON (The International Society for Krishna Consciousness) temple–the Hare Krishna sect in Bangalore. My dad was worried they would kidnap us and he would never see us again. The event was rather underwhelming in many ways, surprisingly. I couldn’t take any photos at all inside the compound, so the photos below are all pulled off of the internet. I did get a really cool shot, though of a dhobi ghat, or a big open air laundry facility just outside the temple.

The images below I pulled off of the internet. I picked the images of what we saw.  It’s a massive place. The main impression at the entrance where we were allowed to enter was a lot of stairs and a LOT of turnstyles. This place is designed to host lots and lots and lots of people.

  

  

We wound our way around the metal gates, although the place was quite deserted midweek, at least compared to the amount of space there. You head up the steps and stop at two smaller temples en route to the massive one. We had to pay about 200 rupees entrance fee. This fee basically gave us a VIP pass, so the turnstiles that we were in lead us past the lines of people and right up to the front of the shrines. We felt a little silly since we didn’t even know exactly how to act at these shrines and we were blocking the view of people who were very awed by the shrines. But they were interesting to see. Here is one that we saw.

Finally we made our way into the big temple. It is massive. Too massive really. It felt rather impersonal. Big frescoes on the ceiling. Huge chandelier. Massive gold dieties in the front. And to the back three musicians playing a tabla, a sarod and a singer doing the Hari Krishna, Krishna, Krishna, Hare, Hare song.

We were told to follow the path that led to the right of the gold shrine. There is a little desk there that you can see i this photo.  A priest was waiting there to give us a personal blessing over some flowers. And then again we were guided in front of the people sitting up to right in front of the shrine. Luckily a few Indian women were ahead of us through this whole process so we knew what to do.

The main shrine had images of Krishna and Rada, plus some other dieties that we did not recognize. This was the image in  the main shrine.

After sitting on the grass mats and watching the priest ring the bell (in Hindu temples the bell is not to summon the gods but to help the worshipers to get clarity to worship).  Then they had the plate with the smoke as in most Hindu temples and you could pull the smoke to your face.  We then were ushered out of the main area and to the back behind the shrine. Here there were people waiting at table and chairs to talk with you about the sect and to encourage you to make a donation. We walked past those tables. Then we were led back out into the main worship area.  To exit that area you walked through a bookstall where we were allowed to chose two pieces of literature for free. Mom choose a book called “Coming Back: The Science of Reincarnation” and I chose “Bhagavad Gita for Beginners”   As we left one of the priests said, “Hare Krishna! You say, too, say, “Hare Krishna!!”

The place wasn’t threatening really other than that table in the back of the shrine where they wanted you to sit down and talk. Also in one of the gift areas there was this interesting little box of a room that reminded me of a Catholic confessional where you could go in and ask any question for free. Sample questions on the wall included “What happens after we die? How do I link my life to God?” and so on.

Then we were led through a maze of gift shops that went on and on and on. But like the Shiva temple last week, we found some really interesting and low cost souvenirs. Then we followed the path outside. And that was it! I had expected to see more of the campus. From the website I can tell that they have a goshala (place for holy cows) and a fancy fountain and an ashram and such things. But the campus was not available to the public like it was at the Art of Living and at the Buddhist monastery in Bylakuppe.

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